Institute for Public Safety and Justice

Our Programs



Law Enforcement Division

The Law Enforcement Division of the Institute for Public Safety & Justice currently operates two programs: the Diversity Awareness and Sensitivity Training Program; and the MPD Police-Cadet Program. In the past, this division has operated programs as diverse as: Law Enforcement Seminar Series, Train-the-Trainer Program, and Writing for Effective Prosecution.

 

Roundtable and Workshop Series

A Roundtable and Workshop Series is offered during the course of the year on a range of topics relating to criminal justice issues, prevention and intervention strategies for community residents, service providers, and policy-makers.

 

Diversity Awareness and Sensitivity Training Program

The DASTP developed by the Institute for Public Safety & Justice combines a human relations and spatial perspective to explore how issues of bias, prejudice, and stereotyping impact effective law enforcement and relationship between law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve. The program is individual designed for a specific geographic area to encompass the issues arising relative to diversity in race, ethnicity, class, gender, religion and sexual orientation found within that area. Representatives from cultural and community groups also infuse cultural specific information into the program.

 

Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) Police-Cadet Program

The MPD Police Cadet Program is administered by the Institute for Public Safety and Justice on behalf of the Administration of Justice program at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) and the Metropolitan Police Department. Cadets must be high school graduates, District of Columbia residents, between the ages of 17 and 21. They are hired by the Metropolitan Police Department and work a 20 hour work week while enrolled in nine credit hours of coursework per semester at UDC. In addition to their salary, MPD pays for tuition, fees, and books. Once Cadets have earned 60 semester hours of college-level credit and are 20 1/2 they are eligible to apply for admission to the Metropolitan Police Department. If accepted, they then began their recruit training with MPD. Interested individuals should contact the Metropolitan Police Department-Department of Human Relations. During their tenure in the program Cadets are responsible for maintaining eligibility both with the Metropolitan Police Department, and with the academic standards of the University of the District of Columbia.

 

Strengthening Communities Division

Strengthening Communities Initiatives encompass a variety of activities. The current activity in this area focuses on providing technical assistance to strengthen and develop innovations in neighborhood based prevention/intervention services as well as data collection for analysis and research to improving program efficacy outcomes. Previous activities have included a Roundtable and Workshop series on topics relating to criminal justice issues, prevention and intervention strategies for: community residents, service providers, and policy-makers.

 

Issues Seminar Series

Seminar Topics for this year have included:

  • The District of Columbia Citizen-Complaint Review Board
  • Domestic Violence
  • Hip-Hop and the African-American Community
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    East of the River Initiative

    The East of the River (EOR) Initiative is a programmatic intervention targeted towards youth and young adults. Initially designed as a pilot project targeting Wards 7 and 8, it is eventually planned to expand this initiative city-wide. The EOR Initiative developed and implemented the "Both Sides of the Street" Program for high school students to provide an initial programmatic intervention with follow-up services by community-based non-profit providers.

     

    Homeland Security - Emergency Management Division

    The Homeland Security-Emergency Management Division has a local and national thrust. The Institute for Public Safety & Justice developed and offered one of the first WMD training programs for local level emergency responders following 9/11. This program was targeted towards those security personnel responsible for safeguarding District of Columbia government office buildings, as well as representatives from selected regional agencies. The Institute for Public Safety & Justice was one of 12 award recipients of the Department of Homeland Security's 2007 Competitive Training Grants Program enabling the development of the Homeland Security-Emergency Management Legal Issues Project.

     

    Legal Issues Project

    The Homeland Security-Emergency Management Legal Issues Project (HSEM-LIP) results from a cooperative agreement between the University of the District of Columbia and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS-FEMA). HSEM-LIP addresses the legal issues relating to preparation, response, and recovery from terrorist incidents and catastrophic events. This project is intended to strengthen the nation's legal preparedness through the development and implementation of a national training program. It will fill a gap in the nation's innovative training programs addressing high priority national homeland security training needs.